Vitamin D pills do not reduce the incidence of fractures, according to a study

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According to a study, taking supplements of Vitamin D, popularly referred to as the “sunshine vitamin,” may not lower the incidence of fractures in adults.

Despite the fact that vitamin D supplements are frequently prescribed and used to support bone health, there is conflicting evidence regarding whether these supplements actually lower the risk of fractures in the general population.

Due to numerous studies suggesting that vitamin D supplements play a significant impact in the severity of COVID, demand for them rose significantly during the epidemic.

The new study, which was released in The New England Journal of Medicine, enhances knowledge in this area. It demonstrated that supplemental vitamin D3 (2000 IU/day) did not lower total, non-vertebral, or hip fractures when compared to placebo.

Additionally, the analyses revealed that supplemented Vitamin D3 had no impact on significant osteoporotic fractures, wrist fractures, or pelvic fractures.

According to lead author Meryl LeBoff, Chief of the Calcium and Bone Section in the Endocrine Division at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in the US, “overall, the results from this large clinical trial do not support the use of vitamin D supplements to reduce fractures in generally healthy US men and women.”

vitamin d pills
Close up of Vitamin D3 Omega 3 fish oil capsules on green background

LeBoff noted that “these findings do not apply to persons with poor bone mass, osteoporosis, or vitamin D deficiency.”

The majority of trial participants were not deficient in vitamin D and may have previously attained the amount required for bone health.

According to LeBoff, “our ongoing investigations are focusing on whether free vitamin D levels or genetic variation in vitamin D metabolism, absorption, or receptor function may provide information about individuals who may benefit from supplemented vitamin D on musculoskeletal health.

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Over 25,000 persons participated in a clinical experiment that was done by the study’s researchers.

Over a median follow-up of 5.3 years, 1,991 incidence fractures in 1,551 patients were confirmed.

According to a study, taking supplements of Vitamin D, popularly referred to as the “sunshine vitamin,” may not lower the incidence of fractures in adults.

Despite the fact that vitamin D supplements are frequently prescribed and used to support bone health, there is conflicting evidence regarding whether these supplements actually lower the risk of fractures in the general population.

Due to numerous studies suggesting that vitamin D supplements play a significant impact in the severity of COVID, demand for them rose significantly during the epidemic.

The new study, which was released in The New England Journal of Medicine, enhances knowledge in this area. It demonstrated that supplemental vitamin D3 (2000 IU/day) did not lower total, non-vertebral, or hip fractures when compared to placebo.

Additionally, the analyses revealed that supplemented Vitamin D3 had no impact on significant osteoporotic fractures, wrist fractures, or pelvic fractures.

According to lead author Meryl LeBoff, Chief of the Calcium and Bone Section in the Endocrine Division at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in the US, “overall, the results from this large clinical trial do not support the use of vitamin D supplements to reduce fractures in generally healthy US men and women.”

LeBoff noted that “these findings do not apply to persons with poor bone mass, osteoporosis, or vitamin D deficiency.”

The majority of trial participants were not deficient in vitamin D and may have previously attained the amount required for bone health.

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According to LeBoff, “our ongoing investigations are focusing on whether free vitamin D levels or genetic variation in vitamin D metabolism, absorption, or receptor function may provide information about individuals who may benefit from supplemented vitamin D on musculoskeletal health.

Over 25,000 persons participated in a clinical experiment that was done by the study’s researchers.

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